What are archaebacteria: life's third domain or monoderm prokaryotes related to Gram‐positive bacteria? A new proposal for the classification of prokaryotic organisms

@article{Gupta1998WhatAA,
  title={What are archaebacteria: life's third domain or monoderm prokaryotes related to Gram‐positive bacteria? A new proposal for the classification of prokaryotic organisms},
  author={Radhey S. Gupta},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={1998},
  volume={29}
}
  • Radhey S. Gupta
  • Published 1998
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Molecular Microbiology
The evolutionary relationship within prokaryotes is examined based on signature sequences (defined as conserved inserts or deletions shared by specific taxa) and phylogenies derived from different proteins. Archaebacteria are indicated as being monophyletic by a number of proteins related to the information transfer processes. In contrast, for several other highly conserved proteins, common signature sequences are present in archaebacteria and Gram‐positive bacteria, whereas Gram‐negative… Expand
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