What are We Learning about Speciation and Extinction from the Canary Islands?

@article{Illera2016WhatAW,
  title={What are We Learning about Speciation and Extinction from the Canary Islands?},
  author={Juan Carlos Illera and Lewis G. Spurgin and Eduardo Rodr{\'i}guez-Exp{\'o}sito and Manuel Nogales and Juan Carlos Rando},
  journal={Ardeola},
  year={2016},
  volume={63},
  pages={15 - 33}
}
Summary. Oceanic islands are excellent systems for allowing biologists to test evolutionary hypotheses due to their relative simplicity of habitats, naturally replicated study design and high levels of endemic taxa with conspicuous variation in form, colour and behaviour. Over the last two decades the Canary Islands archipelago has proved an ideal system for evolutionary biologists who seek to unravel how biodiversity arises and disappears. In this review we have evaluated the contribution of… 
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