What animals can teach us about human language: the phonological continuity hypothesis

@article{Fitch2018WhatAC,
  title={What animals can teach us about human language: the phonological continuity hypothesis},
  author={W. Tecumseh Fitch},
  journal={Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences},
  year={2018},
  volume={21},
  pages={68-75}
}
  • W. Tecumseh Fitch
  • Published 2018
  • Computer Science
  • Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
  • Progress in linking between the disparate levels of cognitive description and neural implementation requires explicit, testable, computationally based hypotheses. One such hypothesis is the dendrophilia hypothesis, which suggests that human syntactic abilities rely on our supra-regular computational abilities, implemented via an auxiliary memory store (a ‘stack’) centred on Broca's region via its connections with other cortical areas. Because linguistic phonology requires less powerful… CONTINUE READING

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