What a woodchuck could chuck

@article{Harrington2014WhatAW,
  title={What a woodchuck could chuck},
  author={M. Harrington},
  journal={Lab Animal},
  year={2014},
  volume={43},
  pages={117-117}
}
taxonomy PHYLUM: Chordata CLass: Mammalia Order: rodentia FaMiLY: sciuridae strategies— balancing the physiological and ecological costs against the benefits—has also been examined in woodchucks. Researchers found that woodchucks’ body mass correlated positively with body temperature during torpor and correlated negatively with the fraction of time spent in torpor, meaning that larger woodchucks spent less time in torpor and at higher body temperatures than smaller woodchucks5. The scientists… Expand

References

SHOWING 1-7 OF 7 REFERENCES
The woodchuck model of hepatitis B virus infection.
TLDR
Chronic WHV carrier woodchucks have become a valuable animal model for the preclinical evaluation of antiviral therapy for HBV infection, providing useful pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic results in a relevant animal disease model. Expand
The woodchuck as an animal model for pathogenesis and therapy of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.
TLDR
Chronic WHV carrier woodchucks provide a well-characterized mammalian model for preclinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of drug candidates, experimental therapeutic vaccines, and immunomodulators for the treatment and prevention of HBV disease sequelae. Expand
Effect of body mass on hibernation strategies of woodchucks (Marmota monax).
TLDR
The hibernation-optimization hypothesis is supported by demonstrating the relationship between body mass and characteristics of torpor and contributing toward a fuller understanding of this concept. Expand
Proteomic mechanisms of cardioprotection during mammalian hibernation in woodchucks, Marmota monax.
TLDR
Changes in the heart proteome are investigated and related signaling networks that are involved in establishing cardioprotection in woodchucks during hibernation are revealed, which may provide new directions to protect myocardium of non-hibernating animals, especially humans, from cardiac dysfunction induced by hypothermic stress and myocardial ischemia. Expand
The woodchuck, Marmota monax, as a laboratory animal.
The woodchuck or groundhog (Marmota monax) has been used as a biomedical model for studies of obesity and energy balance, endocrine and metabolic function, central nervous system control mechanismsExpand
The woodchuck, Marmota monax, as a laboratory animal.
The woodchuck or groundhog (Marmota monax) has been used as a biomedical model for studies of obesity and energy balance, endocrine and metabolic function, central nervous system control mechanismsExpand