What Paint Can Tell Us: A Fractal Analysis of Neurological Changes in Seven Artists

@article{Forsythe2017WhatPC,
  title={What Paint Can Tell Us: A Fractal Analysis of Neurological Changes in Seven Artists},
  author={Alex Forsythe and Tamsin Maria Williams and Ronan G. Reilly},
  journal={Neuropsychology},
  year={2017},
  volume={31},
  pages={1–10}
}
Objective: The notion that artistic capability increases with dementia is both novel and largely unsupported by available literature. Recent research has suggested an emergence of artistic capabilities to be a by-product of involuntary behaviour seen with dementia, as opposed to a progression in original thinking (de Souza, et al., 2010). A far more complementary explanation comes from Hannemann (2006), who suggests that art offers an outlet for dementia patients to refine and sharpen their… 

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