• Corpus ID: 88503264

What Justice for Rwanda? Gacaca versus Truth Commission?

@inproceedings{Reuchamps2008WhatJF,
  title={What Justice for Rwanda? Gacaca versus Truth Commission?},
  author={Min Reuchamps},
  year={2008}
}
In post-genocide Rwanda, in addition to gacaca courts, a truth commission is needed in order to promote justice and foster reconciliation. In the context of transitional justice, retributive justice, which seeks justice and focuses on the perpetrators, appears to be inadequate to lead a society towards reconciliation. Therefore, some forms of restorative justice, which emphasize the healing of the whole society, seem necessary. In Rwanda, gacaca courts and a truth commission are complementary… 

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