What Is Ego Depletion? Toward a Mechanistic Revision of the Resource Model of Self-Control

@article{Inzlicht2012WhatIE,
  title={What Is Ego Depletion? Toward a Mechanistic Revision of the Resource Model of Self-Control},
  author={Michael Inzlicht and Brandon J. Schmeichel},
  journal={Perspectives on Psychological Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={7},
  pages={450 - 463}
}
According to the resource model of self-control, overriding one’s predominant response tendencies consumes and temporarily depletes a limited inner resource. Over 100 experiments have lent support to this model of ego depletion by observing that acts of self-control at Time 1 reduce performance on subsequent, seemingly unrelated self-control tasks at Time 2. The time is now ripe, therefore, not only to broaden the scope of the model but to start gaining a precise, mechanistic account of it… Expand

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