What Health Reform Tells Us about American Politics.

@article{Jacobs2020WhatHR,
  title={What Health Reform Tells Us about American Politics.},
  author={Lawrence R. Jacobs and Suzanne Mettler},
  journal={Journal of health politics, policy and law},
  year={2020}
}
The passage and initial implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were imperiled by partisan divisions, court challenges, and the quagmire of federalism. In the aftermath of Republican efforts to repeal the ACA, however, the law not only carries on but also is changing the nature of political debate as its benefits are facilitating increased support for it, creating new constituents who rely on its benefits and share intense attachments to them, and lifting the confidence of Americans in… 

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How do policy feedback effects occur? A growing number of rigorous empirical studies provide evidence that new policies can, indeed, stimulate new politics, such as increased political participation

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