What Can DNA Exonerations Tell Us about Racial Differences in Wrongful-Conviction Rates?

@article{Bjerk2020WhatCD,
  title={What Can DNA Exonerations Tell Us about Racial Differences in Wrongful-Conviction Rates?},
  author={David Bjerk and Eric Helland},
  journal={The Journal of Law and Economics},
  year={2020},
  volume={63},
  pages={341 - 366}
}
  • David Bjerk, Eric Helland
  • Published 2020
  • Psychology
  • The Journal of Law and Economics
  • We show that data on DNA exonerations can be informative about racial differences in wrongful-conviction rates under some assumptions regarding the DNA-exoneration process. We argue that, with respect to rape cases, the observed data and the plausibility of the required assumptions combine to strongly suggest that the wrongful-conviction rate is significantly higher among black convicts than white convicts. By contrast, we argue that the ability of data on DNA exonerations to reveal information… CONTINUE READING
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