Corpus ID: 153706154

What Are the Benefits of Hosting a Major League Sports Franchise

@article{Rappaport2001WhatAT,
  title={What Are the Benefits of Hosting a Major League Sports Franchise},
  author={Jordan Rappaport and Chad R. Wilkerson},
  journal={Econometric Reviews},
  year={2001},
  volume={86},
  pages={55-86}
}
Over the last few decades the number of U.S. metropolitan areas large enough to host a franchise from one of the four major professional sports leagues has soared. Even as major league baseball, football, basketball and hockey have expanded to include more franchises, demand by metro areas continues to exceed supply. Metro areas have thus been forced to compete with each other to retain and attract franchises. ; The resulting large public spending on new sports facilities has been quite… Expand

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