What's in a name? A typological analysis of Aztec placenames

@article{VanEssendelft2018WhatsIA,
  title={What's in a name? A typological analysis of Aztec placenames},
  author={Willem VanEssendelft},
  journal={Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports},
  year={2018}
}
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