What’s really in a Name-Letter Effect? Name-letter preferences as indirect measures of self-esteem

@article{Hoorens2014WhatsRI,
  title={What’s really in a Name-Letter Effect? Name-letter preferences as indirect measures of self-esteem},
  author={Vera Hoorens},
  journal={European Review of Social Psychology},
  year={2014},
  volume={25},
  pages={228 - 262}
}
  • V. Hoorens
  • Published 1 January 2014
  • Psychology
  • European Review of Social Psychology
People show a preference for the letters occurring in their name (Name-Letter Effect), a phenomenon that has inspired the development of a frequently used indirect measure of self-esteem. This article reviews the literature on the Name-Letter Effect as the basis for this measure. It discusses the tasks that have been used to measure name-letter preferences and the algorithms that have been designed to extract self-esteem scores from them. It also reviews the evidence that name-letter… Expand
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References

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A common measure for implicit self-esteem is the name letter effect, traditionally calculated as the rated attractiveness of someone's initials or name letters minus the average attractiveness ofExpand
Initial and noninitial name-letter preferences as obtained through repeated letter rating tasks continue to reflect (different aspects of) self-esteem.
TLDR
It is shown that preferences for initials and noninitials are not simply interchangeable and should be interpreted in terms of state rather than trait self-esteem. Expand
How to Administer the Initial Preference Task
Individuals like their name letters more than non–name letters. This effect has been termed the Name Letter Effect (NLE) and is widely exploited to measure implicit (i.e. automatic, unconscious)Expand
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Although the name-letter task is one of the most frequently used measures of implicit self-esteem, no research has examined whether the name-letter effect emerges for new last name initials andExpand
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