Western scrub-jay funerals: cacophonous aggregations in response to dead conspecifics

@article{Iglesias2012WesternSF,
  title={Western scrub-jay funerals: cacophonous aggregations in response to dead conspecifics},
  author={Teresa L. Iglesias and Richard Mcelreath and Gail L. Patricelli},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2012},
  volume={84},
  pages={1103-1111}
}

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