Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) chemical signals. I. Conspecific discriminations and release of a species‐typical visual display

@article{Duvall1979WesternFL,
  title={Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) chemical signals. I. Conspecific discriminations and release of a species‐typical visual display},
  author={D. Duvall},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Zoology},
  year={1979},
  volume={210},
  pages={321-325}
}
  • D. Duvall
  • Published 1979
  • Biology
  • Journal of Experimental Zoology
Western fence lizards, Sceloporus occidentalis, were exposed to markings, droppings, and exudates (e.g., femoral and proctodeal gland secretions, and feces) collected from conspecific males and females in a chemicalcue, simultaneous discrimination procedure. Females performed no discrimination between unmarked brick surfaces and those labelled by conspecifics of either sex, as indexed by relative numbers of substrate licks or tongue flicks. Males performed significantly more of these actions to… Expand
Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) chemical signals. II. A replication with naturally breeding adults and a test of the Cowles and Phelan hypothesis of rattlesnake olfaction.
  • D. Duvall
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of experimental zoology
  • 1981
TLDR
N nasal olfaction may indeed be more of a "quantitative," distance sensing system that responds to the presence of any pungent substance by initiating further investigation via the tongue-Jacobson's organ system, as suggested by Cowles and Phelan ('58). Expand
Western Fence Lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) chemical signals. III. An experimental ethogram of conspecific body licking
TLDR
The results suggest the possibility that pheromones carried on, or exuded from, certain fence lizard body regions, such as the head and face, for example, may play a releasing or eliciting function in social encounters of close physical proximity. Expand
Pheromonal discriminations of sex, reproductive condition, and species by the lacertid lizard Podarcis hispanica.
TLDR
It is reported that males of a lacertid lizard are capable of differential response to surface chemical cues from conspecific males and females, from gravid and nongravid females, and from Conspecific females and females of the closely related sympatric congener, P. bocagei carbonelli. Expand
Iberian Rock Lizards (Lacerta monticola cyreni) Assess Conspecific Information Using Composite Signals from Faecal Pellets
TLDR
The ability to discriminate chemicals from faeces, and the effects of faecal pellets on lizard behaviour, suggests that faecs might act as composite signals (visual and chemical) in the intraspecific communication of this lizard. Expand
Discrimination of chemical stimuli in conspecific fecal pellets by a visually adept iguanid lizard, Crotaphytus collaris
TLDR
It is suggested that chemical signals may play a greater role in intraspecific communication than previously thought in this highly visual lizard. Expand
Field presentation of male secretions alters social display in Sceloporus virgatus but not S. undulatus lizards
TLDR
Responses to conspecific secretions in two Sceloporus species differing in visual signaling are studied, finding chemical signals may play a different role in social signaling in the species with the loss of the abdominal color signal. Expand
Social significance of ventrolateral coloration in the fence lizard, Sceloporus undulatus
TLDR
The blue ventral colour patches of the fence lizard, Sceloporus undulatus, allow males to recognize the sex of conspecifics, and responses to lizards painted to match the ventral patterns of their own sex were virtually identical to their responses to unpainted lizards, indicating that painting alone did not alter their reactions. Expand
Prey detection in juveniles of an agamid lizard, Calotes versicolor (Daudin, 1802) (Reptilia: Squamata)
TLDR
The study shows that C. versicolor juveniles use visual cues and prey movements in detection and capture of prey and chemical cues are of little value in prey detection in C.Versicolor. Expand
Interspecific odour discrimination by a lizard (Eumeces laticeps)
TLDR
It is hypothesized that E. laticeps produces a pheromone which may function for species identification and it is tempting to speculate that it may serve as a pre-mating mechanism for maintaining reproductive isolation from syntopic congeners, but insufficient information is avialable to draw firm conclusions regarding such a function. Expand
Male southern water skinks (Eulamprus heatwolei) use both visual and chemical cues to detect female sexual receptivity
TLDR
It is speculated that males use vision to find females and then use their chemosensory ability to chemically evaluate female sexual receptivity once the pair are in close proximity. Expand
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