West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease

@article{Davis2006WestNV,
  title={West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease},
  author={Larry E. Davis and Roberta L. DeBiasi and Diane E. Goade and Kathleen Y. Haaland and Jennifer A. Harrington and JoAnn Harnar and Steven A. Pergam and Molly King and B. K. DeMasters and Kenneth L. Tyler},
  journal={Annals of Neurology},
  year={2006},
  volume={60}
}
Since 1999, there have been nearly 20,000 cases of confirmed symptomatic West Nile virus (WNV) infection in the United States, and it is likely that more than 1 million people have been infected by the virus. WNV is now the most common cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in the United States, and it will likely remain an important cause of neurological disease for the foreseeable future. Clinical syndromes produced by WNV infection include asymptomatic infection, West Nile Fever, and West Nile… 
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The findings show that the factors that influence prognosis from the initial presentation include age, gender, and specific neurological deficits at onset, which predict either severity or long-term recovery of neurological function.
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