Were luxury foods the first domesticates? Ethnoarchaeological perspectives from Southeast Asia

@article{Hayden2003WereLF,
  title={Were luxury foods the first domesticates? Ethnoarchaeological perspectives from Southeast Asia},
  author={Brian Hayden},
  journal={World Archaeology},
  year={2003},
  volume={34},
  pages={458 - 469}
}
There are important reasons for considering the first domesticated plants and animals as luxury foods primarily used in feasting. Using Southeast Asian tribal society as a case study, it is demonstrated that all the domesticated animals and the most important of the domesticated plants constitute forms of wealth that are primarily or exclusively used in feasting contexts. In addition, numerous studies have demonstrated that feasting generates powerful forces that intensify and increase resource… Expand

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