Weight faltering and failure to thrive in infancy and early childhood

@article{Shields2012WeightFA,
  title={Weight faltering and failure to thrive in infancy and early childhood},
  author={Brian J. Shields and Ian D Wacogne and Charlotte Margaret Wright},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2012},
  volume={345}
}
#### Summary Weight faltering, or failure to thrive, is a childhood condition that provokes concern about possible neglect, deprivation, and organic illness. However, research over the past 20 years has brought the validity of this concern into question, leading to the proposal that management should be less aggressive.1 We summarise the evidence base, discuss new developments, and provide a practical approach to management. Failure to thrive has been defined in a range of ways, with no… Expand
Growth Faltering: The New and the Old
Growth faltering has an evolving history in terms of definition, methods of assessment, management, and long-term outcomes. This phenomenon was first known as “cease to thrive” in 1897, and has sinceExpand
Faltering growth in children: summary of NICE guidance
TLDR
This article summarises the recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance on the recognition and management of infants and preschool children with faltering growth and describes current practice in assessment and management across the UK. Expand
Failure to Thrive: A Practical Guide.
TLDR
In most cases, an appropriate growth velocity can be established with outpatient management based on proper nutrition and family support, and primary care physicians can effectively treat most children with FTT, and subspecialist consultation or hospitalization is rarely indicated. Expand
Failure to thrive in infant and toddlers: a practical flowchart-based approach in a hospital setting
TLDR
The flow chart presented was accurate for diagnosing children with failure to thrive in a hospital setting and distinct organic and non- organic forms and was cost-effective to avoid unnecessary blood test or consultations in most non-organic diagnoses. Expand
Failure to Thrive in the Outpatient Clinic: A New Insight
TLDR
This new insight integrates the “classical” anthropometric criteria for definition and treatment, in the aim of warranting both a regular increase in size and an overall adequate development and health status. Expand
Má Progressão Ponderal: Que Avaliação Inicial é Necessária?
TLDR
The failure to thrive cases without suspicion of organic cause do not need a complementary in-vestigation and the new growth charts are better to identifyfailure to thrive with underlying organic disease. Expand
A practical approach to the assessment of faltering growth in the infant and toddler
TLDR
A framework is suggested to aid advice to be given to parents with a child who has faltering growth due to inadequate nutritional intake for their energy requirements and the identification of the less than 5% of cases with an underlying organic disease. Expand
Ongoing vomiting in an infant
TLDR
It can be difficult to distinguish between colic—excessive, frequent crying in a well baby—and GOR, GORD, or “fussy eating” because of the overlap of symptoms and the lack of useful investigations. Expand
Parental Socioeconomic Status and Weight Faltering in Infants in Japan
TLDR
Infants from lower income families have a greater risk of weight faltering in Japan, and social policies to address maldistribution of weightfaltering due to household income are needed. Expand
Faltering growth
F altering growth is a common paediatric presentation in primary care; it often presents following routine health visitor surveillance or is highlighted by parental concern. It is important toExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 41 REFERENCES
Identification and management of failure to thrive: a community perspective
  • C. Wright
  • Medicine
  • Archives of disease in childhood
  • 2000
TLDR
The term was first coined to describe a syndrome of delayed growth and development also called the “maternal deprivation syndrome”, although it is now accepted that FTT has a predominantly nutritional cause, the implication of an association with emotional and physical deprivation persists. Expand
Weight Faltering in Infancy and IQ Levels at 8 Years in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children
TLDR
Failure to thrive in infancy was associated with persisting deficits in IQ at 8 years; the critical period for growth faltering was birth to 8 weeks; the relationship between infant growth from birth to8 weeks and later intellectual development was approximately linear over the whole range of weight velocities. Expand
Failure to thrive: the prevalence and concurrence of anthropometric criteria in a general infant population
TLDR
No single measurement on its own seems to be adequate for identifying nutritional growth delay, and further longitudinal population studies are needed to investigate the discriminating power of different criteria in detecting significant undernutrition and subsequent outcomes. Expand
The developmental sequelae of nonorganic failure to thrive.
TLDR
There was little evidence of cognitive disadvantage for case group children at school age, suggesting that the adverse effects of early malnutrition on cognitive functioning appear to diminish over time. Expand
What is a normal rate of weight gain in infancy?
TLDR
The value of the thrive index below which only a minority of children fell provided a lower threshold for normality and produced a measure of the discrepancy between a child's predicted and actual growth: the “thrive index”. Expand
What is the long term outcome for children who fail to thrive? A systematic review
TLDR
The IQ difference is of questionable clinical significance, the height and weight differences are larger, but few children were below the 3rd centile at follow up, and the aggressive approach to identification and management of failure to thrive needs reassessing. Expand
Postnatal factors associated with failure to thrive in term infants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children
TLDR
The most important postnatal factors associated with growth faltering are the type and efficiency of feeding: no associations were found with social class or parental education. Expand
Child undernutrition in affluent societies: what are we talking about?
TLDR
It is concluded that in affluent societies the diagnosis of undernutrition is only robust when it relies on a combination of both, that is decline in weight or BMI centile and wasting. Expand
Failure to Thrive and the Risk of Child Abuse: A Prospective Population Survey
TLDR
Early postnatal non-organic failure to thrive is a risk factor for later serious parenting deficiencies, but previous research has overstated its importance. Expand
Risk factors for weight faltering in infancy according to age at onset.
TLDR
In conclusion, weight faltering in infancy is clearly associated with contemporary measured feeding problems, but the risk mechanisms involved differ in early vs. late onset. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...