Weight Gain and Glucose Dysregulation with Second-Generation Antipsychotics and Antidepressants: A Review for Primary Care Physicians

@article{Hasnain2012WeightGA,
  title={Weight Gain and Glucose Dysregulation with Second-Generation Antipsychotics and Antidepressants: A Review for Primary Care Physicians},
  author={Mehrul Hasnain and W. Victor R. Vieweg and Bruce A. Hollett},
  journal={Postgraduate Medicine},
  year={2012},
  volume={124},
  pages={154 - 167}
}
Abstract Second–generation antipsychotics (SGAPs) and second–generation antidepressants (SGADs) have multiple US Food and Drug Administration–approved indications and are frequently prescribed by primary care physicians. We review the relative potential of these drugs to cause weight gain and glucose dysregulation, and offer clinical guidance to minimize and manage this risk. Among SGAPs, clozapine and olanzapine have a high risk for causing weight gain and glucose dysregulation; iloperidone… 
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