Weight Change and the Risk of Gestational Diabetes in Obese Women

@article{Glazer2004WeightCA,
  title={Weight Change and the Risk of Gestational Diabetes in Obese Women},
  author={Nicole L. Glazer and Audrey F Hendrickson and Gina D. Schellenbaum and Beth A Mueller},
  journal={Epidemiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={15},
  pages={733-737}
}
Background: Obesity is an established risk factor for gestational diabetes. It is not known whether this risk might be reduced through weight loss between pregnancies. We sought to determine whether weight loss between pregnancies reduced the risk of gestational diabetes among obese women. Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study of 4102 women with 2 or more singleton live births in Washington State between 1992 and 1998. All subjects were nondiabetic and obese (at least 200 lbs… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
Studies evaluating lifestyle intervention in obese women during pregnancy have reported limited success in decreasing excessive gestational weight gain, and have failed to achieve… Expand
ConditionsLifestyle-related Condition, Macrosomia, Fetal, Obesity
InterventionBehavioral
Does weight loss reduce the recurrence of gestational diabetes in overweight and obese women?
Objective: To estimate the association between prepregnancy weight loss and risk of recurrence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the subsequent pregnancy among overweight and obese women withExpand
Body mass index and weight gain prior to pregnancy and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.
TLDR
Weight gain in the 5 years before pregnancy may increase the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, and women who gained weight at a rate of 2.2 kg/year had a small increased risk of GDM, compared with women with stable weight. Expand
Contribution Weight Characteristics and Height in Relation to Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus
Increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity motivated this prospective examination of gestational diabetes mellitus in relation to self-reported adult height, weight, and weight fluctuation.Expand
Excessive Gestational Weight Gain and Postpartum Weight Retention Among Obese Women
TLDR
Incremental increases in gestational weight gain beyond the current recommendation for obese women substantially increase the risk of weight retention at 1 year postpartum. Expand
Weight characteristics and height in relation to risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.
TLDR
Efforts to prevent obesity and weight gain among young women may reduce gestational diabetes risk, and weight cycling was nonsignificantly related among women who gained 10 kg or more during adulthood. Expand
Maternal Anthropometric Indices and Gestational Diabetes
TLDR
In conclusion, anthropometry does play a significant role in the development of GDM and investigations of its measures may bring about greater understanding of the etiology of the disease, even if not all measures are suitable for clinical use. Expand
Obesity and Pregnancy
TLDR
Overweight and obese women should be advised to aim for a moderate weight loss prior to conception and during the postpartum period, and health care professionals should counsel women on gaining an appropriate amount of weight during pregnancy. Expand
Maternal weight change before pregnancy in relation to birthweight and risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes
TLDR
It is the first to report that in non-overweight women, those who lost weight before pregnancy are at higher risk of having SGA newborns, and whatever the prepregnancy BMI, WCBP was positively associated with a maternal risk of gestational diabetes and hypertension. Expand
Weight loss before conception: A systematic literature review
TLDR
The objective of this study is to assess the effect of weight loss prior to conception in overweight or obese women on a number of health-related outcomes in mother and offspring using studies published between January 2000 and December 2011. Expand
Gestational diabetes: risk of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies.
TLDR
A pregnancy complicated by GDM is at increased risk for subsequent GDM, and the magnitude of risk increases with the number of prior episodes of GDM. Expand
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