Wearing blue light-blocking glasses in the evening advances circadian rhythms in the patients with delayed sleep phase disorder: An open-label trial

@article{Esaki2016WearingBL,
  title={Wearing blue light-blocking glasses in the evening advances circadian rhythms in the patients with delayed sleep phase disorder: An open-label trial},
  author={Yuichi Esaki and Tsuyoshi Kitajima and Yasuhiro Ito and Shigefumi Koike and Yasumi Nakao and Akiko Tsuchiya and Marina Hirose and Nakao Iwata},
  journal={Chronobiology International},
  year={2016},
  volume={33},
  pages={1037 - 1044}
}
ABSTRACT It has been recently discovered that blue wavelengths form the portion of the visible electromagnetic spectrum that most potently regulates circadian rhythm. We investigated the effect of blue light-blocking glasses in subjects with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). This open-label trial was conducted over 4 consecutive weeks. The DSPD patients were instructed to wear blue light-blocking amber glasses from 21:00 p.m. to bedtime, every evening for 2 weeks. To ascertain the outcome of… 
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