Wealth and happiness across the world: material prosperity predicts life evaluation, whereas psychosocial prosperity predicts positive feeling.

@article{Diener2010WealthAH,
  title={Wealth and happiness across the world: material prosperity predicts life evaluation, whereas psychosocial prosperity predicts positive feeling.},
  author={Ed Diener and Weiting Ng and James K. Harter and Raksha Arora},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2010},
  volume={99 1},
  pages={
          52-61
        }
}
The Gallup World Poll, the first representative sample of planet Earth, was used to explore the reasons why happiness is associated with higher income, including the meeting of basic needs, fulfillment of psychological needs, increasing satisfaction with one's standard of living, and public goods. Across the globe, the association of log income with subjective well-being was linear but convex with raw income, indicating the declining marginal effects of income on subjective well-being. Income… Expand

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