We Are What We Eat: Ancient Agriculture Between the Great Lakes

@article{Schoenbrun1993WeAW,
  title={We Are What We Eat: Ancient Agriculture Between the Great Lakes},
  author={David Lee Schoenbrun},
  journal={The Journal of African History},
  year={1993},
  volume={34},
  pages={1 - 31}
}
  • D. Schoenbrun
  • Published 1 March 1993
  • History
  • The Journal of African History
A history of food systems in Africa's Great Lakes region is presented using mostly historical linguistic sources, with help from archaeology and paleoecology. The paper moves beyond understanding the causes and consequences of iron-working as the most important feature of the period between c. 1000 b.c. and c. a.d. 500. I argue that a history of agriculture both gives context to changes in technology and introduces powerful new explanations for historical processes of settlement and… 
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Elsewhere I have set forth a basic outline for charting histories of vegetation change through the use of paleoenvironmental data (Schoenbrun 1991). This essay builds on the previous one by laying
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Elsewhere I have set forth a basic outline for charting histories of vegetation change through the use of paleoenvironmental data (Schoenbrun 1991). This essay builds on the previous one by laying
Cattle herds and banana gardens: the historical geography of the western Great Lakes region,ca AD 800–1500
This paper discusses the importance of economic specializations in banana farming and cattle pastoralism in eastern Africa's Great Lakes region. I present comparative linguistic evidence for the
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