Water vapor in Titan's stratosphere from Cassini CIRS far-infrared spectra

@article{Cottini2012WaterVI,
  title={Water vapor in Titan's stratosphere from Cassini CIRS far-infrared spectra},
  author={Valeria Cottini and Conor A. Nixon and Donald E. Jennings and Carrie M. Anderson and Nicolas Gorius and Gordon L. Bjoraker and Athena Coustenis and Nicholas A. Teanby and Richard K. Achterberg and Bruno B{\'e}zard and Remco J. de Kok and Emmanuel Lellouch and Patrick G. J. Irwin and F. Michael Flasar and Georgios Bampasidis},
  journal={Icarus},
  year={2012},
  volume={220},
  pages={855-862}
}

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