Water Cycling between Ocean and Mantle: Super-Earths Need Not Be Waterworlds

@article{Cowan2014WaterCB,
  title={Water Cycling between Ocean and Mantle: Super-Earths Need Not Be Waterworlds},
  author={Nicolas B. Cowan and Dorian S. Abbot},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2014},
  volume={781},
  pages={27}
}
Large terrestrial planets are expected to have muted topography and deep oceans, implying that most super-Earths should be entirely covered in water, so-called waterworlds. This is important because waterworlds lack a silicate weathering thermostat so their climate is predicted to be less stable than that of planets with exposed continents. In other words, the continuously habitable zone for waterworlds is much narrower than for Earth-like planets. A planet's water is partitioned, however… Expand

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