Water‐soluble carbon monoxide‐releasing molecules: helping to elucidate the vascular activity of the ‘silent killer’

@article{Chatterjee2004WatersolubleCM,
  title={Water‐soluble carbon monoxide‐releasing molecules: helping to elucidate the vascular activity of the ‘silent killer’},
  author={P. Chatterjee},
  journal={British Journal of Pharmacology},
  year={2004},
  volume={142}
}
  • P. Chatterjee
  • Published 2004
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • British Journal of Pharmacology
Carbon monoxide (CO) is formed during the degradation of haeme by haeme oxygenase (HO). As well as being an important signalling molecule and vasodilator, CO also possesses antihypertensive, anti‐inflammatory and antiapoptotic qualities and protects against ischaemic tissue injury. Several approaches have been used to investigate the therapeutic potential of CO, ranging from direct administration of CO gas to the use of prodrugs, which generate CO upon metabolism. A novel approach involves the… Expand
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  • British journal of pharmacology
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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