Watching the best nutcrackers: what capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) know about others’ tool-using skills

@article{Ottoni2004WatchingTB,
  title={Watching the best nutcrackers: what capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) know about others’ tool-using skills},
  author={Eduardo B. Ottoni and Briseida Dogo de Resende and Patr{\'i}cia Izar},
  journal={Animal Cognition},
  year={2004},
  volume={8},
  pages={215-219}
}
The present work is part of a decade-long study on the spontaneous use of stones for cracking hard-shelled nuts by a semi-free-ranging group of brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). Nutcracking events are frequently watched by other individuals - usually younger, less proficient, and that are well tolerated to the point of some scrounging being allowed by the nutcracker. Here we report findings showing that the choice of observational targets is an active, non-random process, and that… 

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