Was Postwar Suburbanization "White Flight"? Evidence from the Black Migration

@article{Boustan2007WasPS,
  title={Was Postwar Suburbanization "White Flight"? Evidence from the Black Migration},
  author={Leah Platt Boustan},
  journal={International Political Economy: Migration eJournal},
  year={2007}
}
  • L. Boustan
  • Published 1 October 2007
  • History
  • International Political Economy: Migration eJournal
Residential segregation by jurisdiction generates disparities in public services and education. The distinctive American pattern - in which blacks live in cities and whites in suburbs - was enhanced by a large black migration from the rural South. I show that whites responded to this black influx by leaving cities and rule out an indirect effect on housing prices as a sole cause. I instrument for changes in black population by using local economic conditions to predict black migration from… 
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The postwar suburbanization of white households was, in part, a response to black inmigration to central cities. Yet, as early as 1940, cities were themselves highly segregated, offering a viable
Escape from the City? The Role of Race, Income, and Local Public Goods in Post-War Suburbanization
Affluent towns often deliver high-quality public services to their residents. I estimate the willingness to pay to live in a high-income suburb, above and beyond the demand of wealthy neighbors, by
White Suburbanization and African-American Home Ownership, 1940-1980
Between 1940 and 1980, the homeownership rate among metropolitan African-American households increased by 27 percentage points. Nearly three-quarters of this increase occurred in central cities. We
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  • L. Boustan
  • History, Economics
    American economic journal. Applied economics
  • 2012
I examine changes in the city-suburban housing price gap in metropolitan areas with and without court-ordered desegregation plans over the 1970s, narrowing my comparison to housing units on opposite
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Housing is the most important asset for the vast majority of American households and a key driver of racial disparities in wealth. This paper studies how residential segregation by race eroded black
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Is racial heterogeneity responsible for the distressed financial conditions of US central cities and for their limited ability to provide even basic public goods? If so, why? I study these questions
Racial Diversity and Exclusionary Zoning: Evidence from the Great Migration
Why do cities adopt and maintain laws that restrict land use, creating a shortage of affordable housing? Dominant explanations emphasize the economic incentives of homeowners to preserve their
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