Was Australopithecus anamensis ancestral to A. afarensis? A case of anagenesis in the hominin fossil record.

@article{Kimbel2006WasAA,
  title={Was Australopithecus anamensis ancestral to A. afarensis? A case of anagenesis in the hominin fossil record.},
  author={William H. Kimbel and Charles A. Lockwood and Carol V. Ward and Meave G. Leakey and Yoel Rak and Donald Carl Johanson},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2006},
  volume={51 2},
  pages={
          134-52
        }
}
A new species of Kolpochoerus (Mammalia: Suidae) from the Pliocene of Central Afar, Ethiopia: Its Taxonomy and Phylogenetic Relationships
TLDR
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Whence Australopithecus africanus? Comparing the Skulls of South African and East African Australopithecus
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Was the Early Pliocene hominin 'Australopithecus' anamensis a hard object feeder?
TLDR
Although ‘A.’ anamensis appears to have had the trophic capability to process a fairly wide range of foods, including the hard, brittle items that might be expected in the sorts of environments in which it is found, those few individuals the authors have been able to sample do not appear to have ingested these sorts of items while their microwear was being formed.
New hominid fossils from Woranso-Mille (Central Afar, Ethiopia) and taxonomy of early Australopithecus.
TLDR
The Woranso-Mille hominids cannot be unequivocally assigned to either taxon due to their dental morphological intermediacy, but could be an indication that the Kanapoi, Allia Bay, and Asa Issie Au.
Phylogeny of early Australopithecus: new fossil evidence from the Woranso-Mille (central Afar, Ethiopia)
  • Y. Haile-Selassie
  • Environmental Science, Geography
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2010
TLDR
The Woranso-Mille hominids show that there is no compelling evidence to falsify the hypothesis of ‘chronospecies pair’ or ancestor–descendant relationship between Au.
"Lucy" redux: a review of research on Australopithecus afarensis.
TLDR
The discovery and naming of A. afarensis coincided with important developments in theory and methodology in paleoanthropology; in addition, important fossil and genetic discoveries were changing expectations about hominin divergence dates from extant African apes.
New fossils of Australopithecus anamensis from Kanapoi, West Turkana, Kenya (2003-2008).
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TLDR
Based on the limited postcranial evidence available, A. anamensis appears to have been habitually bipedal, although it retained some primitive features of its upper limbs, and there appears to be no autapomorphies precluding A.Anamensis from ancestry of A. afarensis.
New specimens and confirmation of an early age for Australopithecus anamensis
TLDR
Isotope dating confirms A.anamensis' intermediate age as being between those of Ardipithecus ramidus, and Australopithecus afarensis, and new specimens of maxilla, mandible and capitate show that this species is demonstrably more primitive than A.afarensis.
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TLDR
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