Walking on inclines: how do desert ants monitor slope and step length

@article{Seidl2007WalkingOI,
  title={Walking on inclines: how do desert ants monitor slope and step length},
  author={Tobias Seidl and R{\"u}diger Wehner},
  journal={Frontiers in Zoology},
  year={2007},
  volume={5},
  pages={8 - 8}
}
BackgroundDuring long-distance foraging in almost featureless habitats desert ants of the genus Cataglyphis employ path-integrating mechanisms (vector navigation). This navigational strategy requires an egocentric monitoring of the foraging path by incrementally integrating direction, distance, and inclination of the path. Monitoring the latter two parameters involves idiothetic cues and hence is tightly coupled to the ant's locomotor behavior.ResultsIn a kinematic study of desert ant… 

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...

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