Walking in a Winter Wonderland? Strategies for Early and Middle Pleistocene Survival in Midlatitude Europe

@article{Hosfield2016WalkingIA,
  title={Walking in a Winter Wonderland? Strategies for Early and Middle Pleistocene Survival in Midlatitude Europe},
  author={Robert Hosfield},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2016},
  volume={57},
  pages={653 - 682}
}
  • R. Hosfield
  • Published 26 August 2016
  • Environmental Science
  • Current Anthropology
Any occupation of northern Europe by Lower Paleolithic hominins, even those occurring during full interglacials, must have addressed the challenges of marked seasonality and cold winters. These would have included the problems of windchill and frostbite; duration, distribution, and depth of snow cover; reduced daylight hours; and distribution and availability of animal and plant foods. Solutions can essentially be characterized as a “stick or twist” choice, that is, year-round presence on a… 
Clothing and Hypothermia as Limitations for Midlatitude Hominin Settlement during the Pleistocene: A Comment on Hosfield 2016
  • I. Gilligan
  • Environmental Science
    Current Anthropology
  • 2017
Hosfield (2016) examines how hominins survived—or did not survive—winter conditions in midlatitude environments during the Early and Middle Pleistocene. The archaeological record indicates that
Fire-Free Hominin Strategies for Coping with Cool Winter Temperatures in North-Western Europe from Before 800,000 to Circa 400,000 Years Ago
There is no consensus on the chronology of fire use, with suggestions ranging from earliest use by Homo erectus 1.8 mya to relatively recent Anatomically Modern Humans. While it is widely agreed that
Short-Term Occupations During the Early Middle Paleolithic in Eastern Germany
Prehistoric hunter–gatherers frequently relocated to avoid foraging in previously depleted areas. Lakes and rivers played important roles in these movements as fixed locations in the landscape where
Between a rock and a cold place: Neanderthal biocultural cold adaptations
TLDR
It is well-accepted that Neanderthals appear to be the most cold-adapted of known fossil hominin groups; however, there are still many unknowns.
The use of fire and human distribution
TLDR
The current state of knowledge of the chronology of hominin dispersal into temperate latitudes, from the earliest occupants to the authors' own species, and the archeological evidence for fire use is outlined.
Background to Neanderthal presence in Western Mediterranean Europe
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 162 REFERENCES
A functional approach to Paleolithic open-air habitation structures
  • W. Chu
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 2009
Abstract Advances in hominin bioenergetics and paleoclimate reconstructions suggest that morphology was an insufficient buffer against the cool climate of Pleistocene Europe. To maintain homeostasis,
Riparian landscapes and human habitat preferences during the Hoxnian (MIS 11) Interglacial
The archaeological, environmental and geological data from Hoxnian Interglacial (Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11) sites from Britain are examined to elucidate the type of habitats that humans preferred
Early Pleistocene human occupation at the edge of the boreal zone in northwest Europe
TLDR
It is shown that Early Pleistocene hominins were present in northern Europe >0.78 Myr ago when they were able to survive at the southern edge of the boreal zone, which has significant implications for the understanding of early human behaviour, adaptation and survival, as well as the tempo and mode of colonization after their first dispersal out of Africa.
Human display and dispersal: A case study from biotidal Britain in the Middle and Upper Pleistocene
TLDR
It is argued that this development can be explained by the selective pressure from population dispersal for novel forms of cultural display that enhanced information exchange among adaptive generalists and which allowed the stretching of social relationships in space and time.
Humans in the Hoxnian: habitat, context and fire use at Beeches Pit, West Stow, Suffolk, UK†
A Lower Palaeolithic industry at Beeches Pit, West Stow, Suffolk, occurs within an interglacial sequence that immediately overlies glacial deposits, referable to the Anglian Lowestoft Formation.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...