Waiting for Merlot

@article{Kumar2014WaitingFM,
  title={Waiting for Merlot},
  author={Amit Kumar and Matthew A. Killingsworth and Thomas Gilovich},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={25},
  pages={1924 - 1931}
}
Experiential purchases (money spent on doing) tend to provide more enduring happiness than material purchases (money spent on having). Although most research comparing these two types of purchases has focused on their downstream hedonic consequences, the present research investigated hedonic differences that occur before consumption. We argue that waiting for experiences tends to be more positive than waiting for possessions. Four studies demonstrate that people derive more happiness from the… Expand

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