WOMAN DANCING DREAMING: PSYCHOSOCIAL BENEFITS OF THE ABORIGINAL OUTSTATION MOVEMENT

@article{Morice1976WOMANDD,
  title={WOMAN DANCING DREAMING: PSYCHOSOCIAL BENEFITS OF THE ABORIGINAL OUTSTATION MOVEMENT},
  author={Rodney D. Morice},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={1976},
  volume={2}
}
  • R. Morice
  • Published 1 December 1976
  • Psychology
  • Medical Journal of Australia
The establishment of an Aboriginal outstation, or small autonomous community, is described. Some of the beneficial psychosocial changes observed during an eighteen‐month period are described, and some possible reasons for them outlined. The outstation movement is presented as a viable, Aboriginal‐initiated solution to some of the dilemmas facing present‐day Australian Aborigines. 

Problem-Posing Research and Mental Health Care in a Transcultural Setting

Many problems confronted by the transcultural psychiatrist are only marginally psychiatric in nature, including problems of alcoholism and inhalant abuse often endemic in Australian Aboriginal, Amerindian and Inuit communities.

Overview

to provide an emic insight into behavioural phenomena, written as if from within Aboriginal culture, all we achieve is an imposed pseudo-emic account. The cultural gap remains, creating ample

Beneficial impact of the Homelands Movement on health outcomes in central Australian Aborigines

Prevalence of obesity, hypertension and diabetes in two groups of Aboriginal adults: those living in homelands versus centralised communities in central Australia and over a seven‐year period.

Psychiatric Diagnosis in a Transcultural Setting: The Importance of Lexical Categories

  • R. Morice
  • Psychology
    British Journal of Psychiatry
  • 1978
Summary In a transcultural setting, psychiatric diagnosis is often impeded by language and cultural barriers. A greater reliance on observed or reported behaviour than on the self-reporting of

Personality Disorder in Transcultural Perspective

  • R. Morice
  • Psychology
    The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry
  • 1979
An examination of the terms for anger and aggression used by a Central Australian tribal Aboriginal group demonstrates that Aborigines differentiate them both quantitatively and qualitatively.

Indigenous peoples' livelihoods and emerging bush produce industries : recent experiences from Australia's arid zone

"This thesis details the experiences of Aboriginal people involved in a variety of bush produce industries in Australia‟s arid zone, focusing on effects to their livelihoods and well-being, and

Preliminary development and content validity of a measure of Australian Aboriginal cultural engagement

The ACES shows promise for being a useful tool in assessing the cultural engagement of Australian Aboriginal clients and there is a need for further psychometric assessment and field trials to assess its utility.

Methodologies in East Arnhem Land

‘Talking About Smoking in East Arnhem Land: Denormalisation, Stigmatisation and Leadership’ was a research project that began in 2014 in East Arnhem Land, amongst the Yolŋu peoples. The study

Implications of land rights reform for Indigenous health

  • N. Watson
  • Political Science
    The Medical journal of Australia
  • 2007
The leasing scheme will diminish the control that traditional owners previously exercised over their lands, at odds with research indicating that control over land is a positive influence on Indigenous health.

Conceptualising Therapeutic Environments through Culture, Indigenous Knowledge and Landscape for Health and Well-Being

Academic research has long established that interaction with the natural environment is associated with better overall health outcomes. Notably, the area of therapeutic environments has been borne

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 21 REFERENCES

SOCIAL MEDICINE IN CENTRAL AUSTRALIA

  • R. Hausfeld
  • Political Science
    The Medical journal of Australia
  • 1973
First, it is necessary to make very clear the distinction between mortality and morbidity among Aborigines in remote areas or elsewhere. To take the area (Central Australia) which is the concern of

Aboriginal man and environment in Australia

Man came to Australia well before the end of the Pleistocene epoch - the so-called Ice Age. To understand his history, then, both early and later, calls for an understanding of climate and

The Australian Aborigines

IN the latest number of the Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales (vol. xxiii. part 2) there are two remarkably interesting articles on the Australian aborigines. One of

Bristol Floods 1968. Controlled Survey of Effects on Health of Local Community Disaster

  • G. Bennet
  • Medicine, History
    British medical journal
  • 1970
There was a 50% increase in the number of deaths among those whose homes had been flooded, with a conspicuous rise in deaths from cancer, and the men appeared less well able to cope with the experience of disaster than the women.

FRESHWATER DROWNING AND NEAR–DROWNING ACCIDENTS INVOLVING CHILDREN: A FIVE–YEAR TOTAL POPULATION STUDY

Rates for drowning and near‐drowning accidents after a fresh water immersion, by site, age and outcome (survival versus fatality), are presented for the first time.

Medicine at law.

  • D. Amundson
  • Medicine
    The Journal of the Indiana State Medical Association
  • 1972
Inspecting of the bowel 15-25 cm above the anus may reveal a malignant or premalignant lesion which would not be identified by proctoscopy alone.

Attachment Behaviour in Man, Edward Stirling Memorial Lecture for 1976, Adelaide

  • 1976