WHY EPISTASIS IS IMPORTANT FOR SELECTION AND ADAPTATION

@article{Hansen2013WHYEI,
  title={WHY EPISTASIS IS IMPORTANT FOR SELECTION AND ADAPTATION},
  author={Thomas F. Hansen},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2013},
  volume={67}
}
  • T. F. Hansen
  • Published 1 December 2013
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution
Organisms are built from thousands of genes that interact in complex ways. Still, the mathematical theory of evolution is dominated by a gene‐by‐gene perspective in which genes are assumed to have the same effects regardless of genetic background. Gene interaction, or epistasis, plays a role in some theoretical developments such as the evolution of recombination, reproductive isolation, and canalization, but is strikingly missing from our standard accounts of phenotypic adaptation. This absence… Expand
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