WHY DOES A TRAIT EVOLVE MULTIPLE TIMES WITHIN A CLADE? REPEATED EVOLUTION OF SNAKELIKE BODY FORM IN SQUAMATE REPTILES

@inproceedings{Wiens2006WHYDA,
  title={WHY DOES A TRAIT EVOLVE MULTIPLE TIMES WITHIN A CLADE? REPEATED EVOLUTION OF SNAKELIKE BODY FORM IN SQUAMATE REPTILES},
  author={John J. Wiens and Matthew C. Brandley and Tod W. Reeder},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2006}
}
Abstract Why does a trait evolve repeatedly within a clade? When examining the evolution of a trait, evolutionary biologists typically focus on the selective advantages it may confer and the genetic and developmental mechanisms that allow it to vary. Although these factors may be necessary to explain why a trait evolves in a particular instance, they may not be sufficient to explain phylogenetic patterns of repeated evolution or conservatism. Instead, other factors may also be important, such… 
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TLDR
A phylomorphospace of squamate reptile body shape is constructed and used to test for convergence among clades and taxa that are thought to be under similar selective regimes, finding strong evidence for convergence in body shape amongTaxa that have evolved elongation because of fossoriality or because of inhabiting complex environments, gliding, and sand-dwelling.
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