WHY DO SOME SIBLINGS ATTACK EACH OTHER? COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF AGGRESSION IN AVIAN BROODS

@inproceedings{GonzalezVoyer2007WHYDS,
  title={WHY DO SOME SIBLINGS ATTACK EACH OTHER? COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF AGGRESSION IN AVIAN BROODS},
  author={Alejandro Gonzalez-Voyer and Tam{\'a}s Sz{\'e}kely and Hugh Drummond},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract In many parentally fed species, siblings compete for food not only by begging and scrambling, but also by violently attacking each other. This aggressive competition has mostly been studied in birds, where it is often combined with dominance subordination, aggressive intimidation, and siblicide. Previous experimental and theoretical studies proposed several life-history, morphological, and behavioral variables that may facilitate the evolution of broodmate aggression, and explain its… 
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