Corpus ID: 53659287

WHY AN ECONOMICS OF OUTDOOR RECREATION

@inproceedings{Hanley2003WHYAE,
  title={WHY AN ECONOMICS OF OUTDOOR RECREATION},
  author={N. Hanley and W. Shaw and R. Wright},
  year={2003}
}
This introductory chapter sets out to accomplish four objectives. The first is to explain why outdoor recreation is a relevant and interesting subject of study for economists. Second, the chapter provides a short history of this field of study. Third, we very briefly detail the main methods for estimating the demand for and value of outdoor recreation, and how demand may change when environmental conditions change. Fourth and finally, we preview the chapters that follow this one. 

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References

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This article summarizes the conceptual development and empirical implementation of the travel cost recreation demand model by (1) describing its theoretical underpinnings, (2) outlining how theoryExpand
A Structural Equations Approach to Modeling Consumptive Recreation Demand
Abstract In this analysis we develop a two equation structural model of a count travel cost model of recreational angling demand and angling success. By modeling the two equations jointly we avoidExpand
Impact of Aggregation on the Estimation of Outdoor Recreation Demand Functions
This research indicates that aggregating data tends to cause multicollinearity and difficulty in estimating the parameters of recreation demand functions. Gains in efficiency of estimation of severalExpand
Estimating The Cost Of Leisure Time For Recreation Demand Models
The cost of travel time has commonly been incorporated in recreation demand models as some fucntion of the wage rate. This paper proposes a new methodology of determining the value of leisure time.Expand
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When a sample of recreators is drawn from the general population using a survey, many in the sample will not recreate at a recreation site of interest. This study focuses on nonparticipation inExpand
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Data used in recreation demand modeling are characterized by the facts that trip frequencies are non-negative integers and that consumers are often faced with alternative destinations. This paperExpand
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