WHAT DO OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS MEASURE?

@inproceedings{Geer1988WHATDO,
  title={WHAT DO OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS MEASURE?},
  author={John Gray Geer},
  year={1988}
}
Open-ended questions are frequently used by survey researchers to measure public opinion. Some scholars, however, have doubts about how accurately these kinds of questions measure the views of the public. A chief concern is that the questions tap, in part, people's ability to articulate a response, not their underlying attitudes. This paper tests whether this concern is warranted. Using open-ended questions from the Center for Political Studies, I show that almost all people respond to open… CONTINUE READING

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