WATER VAPOR FEEDBACK AND GLOBAL WARMING 1

@inproceedings{Held2003WATERVF,
  title={WATER VAPOR FEEDBACK AND GLOBAL WARMING 1},
  author={I. Held and B. Soden},
  year={2003}
}
  • I. Held, B. Soden
  • Published 2003
  • Environmental Science
  • ■ Abstract Water vapor is the dominant greenhouse gas, the most important gaseous source of infrared opacity in the atmosphere. As the concentrations of other greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, increase because of human activity, it is centrally important to predict how the water vapor distribution will be affected. To the extent that water vapor concentrations increase in a warmer world, the climatic effects of the other greenhouse gases will be amplified. Models of the Earth’s… CONTINUE READING
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