WARTIME RECRUITING PRACTICES, MARTIAL IDENTITY AND POST-WORLD WAR II DEMOBILIZATION IN COLONIAL KENYA

@article{Brands2005WARTIMERP,
  title={WARTIME RECRUITING PRACTICES, MARTIAL IDENTITY AND POST-WORLD WAR II DEMOBILIZATION IN COLONIAL KENYA},
  author={Henry William Brands},
  journal={The Journal of African History},
  year={2005},
  volume={46},
  pages={103 - 125}
}
  • H. Brands
  • Published 1 March 2005
  • History
  • The Journal of African History
After World War II, African ex-servicemen in Kenya sought to maintain the socioeconomic gains they had accrued through service in the King's African Rifles (KAR). Looking for middle-class employment and social privileges, they challenged existing relationships within the colonial state. For the most part, veterans did not participate in national politics, believing that their goals could be achieved within the confines of colonial society. The postwar actions of KAR veterans are best explained… 
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