Voxel-based lesion–symptom mapping

@article{Bates2003VoxelbasedLM,
  title={Voxel-based lesion–symptom mapping},
  author={Elizabeth A. Bates and Stephen M. Wilson and Ayse Pinar Saygin and Frederic K. Dick and Martin I. Sereno and Robert T. Knight and Nina F. Dronkers},
  journal={Nature Neuroscience},
  year={2003},
  volume={6},
  pages={448-450}
}
For more than a century, lesion–symptom mapping studies have yielded valuable insights into the relationships between brain and behavior, but newer imaging techniques have surpassed lesion analysis in examining functional networks. Here we used a new method—voxel-based lesion–symptom mapping (VLSM)—to analyze the relationship between tissue damage and behavior on a voxel-by-voxel basis, as in functional neuroimaging. We applied VLSM to measures of speech fluency and language comprehension in… 
Power in Voxel-based Lesion-Symptom Mapping
TLDR
General considerations for voxel-based methods are outlined, the use of a nonparametric permutation test adapted from functional neuroimaging is characterized, and methods for regional power analysis in lesion studies are presented.
Voxel-Based Lesion Symptom Mapping of Coarse Coding and Suppression Deficits in Patients With Right Hemisphere Damage.
TLDR
These lesion-deficit correspondences may help inform the clinical diagnosis and enhance decisions about candidacy for deficit-focused treatment to improve narrative comprehension in individuals with RH damage.
Lesion-symptom mapping in the study of spoken language understanding
TLDR
Future studies involving large patient cohorts derived from multi-centre projects, and multivariate approaches to quantifying patterns of brain damage and patterns of linguistic deficits, will continue to yield new insights into the neural basis of spoken language understanding.
Voxelwise Bayesian lesion-deficit analysis
Permutation-based cluster size correction for voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping
TLDR
This strategy appears to be effective for ruling out situations with no true lesion-symptom relations, but the spatial contiguity of stroke lesions may cause identified lesions-symPTom relations to extend beyond their true regions.
The neuroanatomy of spatial awareness: a large-scale region-of-interest and voxel-based anatomical study
TLDR
The anatomical predictors of deficits of spatial exploration, reading and line bisection in 134 unselected stroke patients with post-acute, right-hemispheric brain injury are examined.
Lesion-Symptom Mapping
TLDR
Methods will be discussed which are currently available to perform lesion-symptom mapping in patients with focal and degenerative cerebellar disease, and which should be included to localize function.
Lesion Symptom Mapping of Domain-Specific Cognitive Impairments using Routine Imaging in Stroke
TLDR
The standardised, brief Oxford Cognitive Screen was able to reliably differentiate distinct neural correlates critically involved in supporting domain-specific cognitive abilities, opening up VLSM techniques to a wealth of clinically relevant studies which can capitalise on using existing clinical brain imaging.
Important considerations in lesion‐symptom mapping: Illustrations from studies of word comprehension
TLDR
The hypothesis that brain regions found to be associated with acute language deficits depend on timing of behavioral measurement, imaging sequences utilized to define the “lesion” (structural abnormality only or structural plus perfusion abnormality), and the power of the study is tested.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 25 REFERENCES
Lesion localization in aphasia with cranial computed tomography and the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Exam
TLDR
There was good correlation between BDAE aphasia type and lesion localization, and the locations of cortical language areas lie in a specific relationship to parts of the ventricular system.
Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography.
TLDR
The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporo-temporal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas.
The anatomy of language: contributions from functional neuroimaging
  • C. Price
  • Psychology, Biology
    Journal of anatomy
  • 2000
TLDR
From functional imaging results, a new anatomically constrained model of word processing is proposed which reconciles the anatomical ambitions of the 19th Century neurologists and the cognitive finesse of the 20th Century cognitive models.
A Role for Somatosensory Cortices in the Visual Recognition of Emotion as Revealed by Three-Dimensional Lesion Mapping
TLDR
It is shown that recognizing emotions from visually presented facial expressions requires right somatosensory-related cortices, and these cortices constitute an additional critical component that functions together with structures such as the amygdala and right visual cortices in retrieving socially relevant information from faces.
Spatial attention deficits in humans: a comparison of superior parietal and temporal-parietal junction lesions.
TLDR
Two groups of patients selected for lesions at the temporal-parietal junction including the superior temporal gyrus, or for lesions involving the parietal but not the inferior temporal region, performed cued-target detection tasks, suggesting that separate mechanisms mediate exogenous and endogenous processes during attention shifts.
Distribution of cortical neural networks involved in word comprehension and word retrieval.
TLDR
It is concluded that single word comprehension and retrieval activate very different distributed regions of cerebral cortex, with Wernicke's area the only region engaged by both processes and with participation during silent word generation of networks involved in vocalization.
Contribution of Human Prefrontal Cortex to Delay Performance
TLDR
It is suggested that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is crucial for gating distracting information as well as maintaining distributed intrahemispheric neural activity during auditory working memory.
Aphasia and Associated Disorders: Taxonomy, Localization, and Recovery
TLDR
Dr Kertesz discusses previous classifications of aphasias, a description of tests used in aphasIA, and treatment for and recovery from aphasia, and uses numerical taxonomy to outline discriminatory characteristics for subsequent identification of acersic individuals.
Speech production: Wernicke, Broca and beyond.
TLDR
The evidence from this study indicates that normal communicative speech is dependent on a number of left hemisphere regions remote from the classic language areas of Wernicke and Broca, and Destruction or disconnection of discrete left extrasylvian and perisylVian cortical regions will account for the qualitative and quantitative differences in the impaired speech production observed in aphasic stroke patients.
...
1
2
3
...