Voting Costs and Voter Turnout in Competitive Elections

@article{Fraga2010VotingCA,
  title={Voting Costs and Voter Turnout in Competitive Elections},
  author={Bernard L. Fraga and Eitan Hersh},
  journal={Behavioral \& Experimental Economics},
  year={2010}
}
In the United States, competitive elections are often concentrated in particular places. These places attract disproportionate attention from news media and election campaigns. Yet many voting studies only test stimuli in uncompetitive environments, or only test for average effects, and simply assume the results are relevant to competitive contexts. This article questions that assumption by utilizing Election Day inclement weather as an exogenous and random cost imposed on voters. We test how… Expand
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