Vostok ice core provides 160,000-year record of atmospheric CO2

@article{Barnola1987VostokIC,
  title={Vostok ice core provides 160,000-year record of atmospheric CO2},
  author={J. Barnola and D. Raynaud and Y. S. Korotkevich and C. Lorius},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1987},
  volume={329},
  pages={408-414}
}
Direct evidence of past atmospheric CO2 changes has been extended to the past 160,000 years from the Vostok ice core. These changes are most notably an inherent phenomenon of change between glacial and interglacial periods. Besides this major 100,000-year cycle, the CO2 record seems to exhibit a cyclic change with a period of some 21,000 years. 
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TLDR
A 106,000-year record of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) along with corresponding isotopic records spanning the last 30,000 years suggest minimal changes in the ratio of marine to terrestrial N2O production. Expand
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A continuous deuterium profile along the 160,000-year Vostok ice core (Antarctica) is interpreted in terms of atmospheric temperature changes. This climatic record is the awaited terrestrialExpand
Vostok ice core: climatic response to CO2 and orbital forcing changes over the last climatic cycle
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