Vostok ice core: climatic response to CO2 and orbital forcing changes over the last climatic cycle

@article{Genthon1987VostokIC,
  title={Vostok ice core: climatic response to CO2 and orbital forcing changes over the last climatic cycle},
  author={G. Genthon and J-M. Barnola and Dominique Raynaud and C. Lorius and Jean Jouzel and Nartsiss I. Barkov and Ye. S. Korotkevich and V. M. Kotlyakov},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1987},
  volume={329},
  pages={414-418}
}
Vostok climate and CO2 records suggest that CO2 changes have had an important climatic role during the late Pleistocene in amplifying the relatively weak orbital forcing. The existence of the 100-kyr cycle and the synchronism between Northern and Southern Hemisphere climates may have their origin in the large glacial–interglacial CO2 changes. 

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  • S. Idso
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 1988

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Vostok ice core provides 160,000-year record of atmospheric CO2

Direct evidence of past atmospheric CO2 changes has been extended to the past 160,000 years from the Vostok ice core. These changes are most notably an inherent phenomenon of change between glacial

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