Vomeronasal organ detects odorants in absence of signaling through main olfactory epithelium

@article{Trinh2003VomeronasalOD,
  title={Vomeronasal organ detects odorants in absence of signaling through main olfactory epithelium},
  author={Kien Trinh and Daniel R Storm},
  journal={Nature Neuroscience},
  year={2003},
  volume={6},
  pages={519-525}
}
It is commonly assumed that odorants are detected by the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and pheromones are sensed through the vomeronasal organ (VNO). The complete loss of MOE-mediated olfaction in type-3 adenylyl cyclase knockout mice (AC3−/−) allowed us to examine chemosensory functions of the VNO in the absence of signaling through the MOE. Here we report that AC3−/− mice are able to detect certain volatile odorants via the VNO. These same odorants elicited electro-olfactogram transients in… Expand
Detection of odorants through the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ of mice.
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TLDR
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  • Nature Reviews Neuroscience
  • 2004
TLDR
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TLDR
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