Vomerolfaction and vomodor

@article{Cooper2005VomerolfactionAV,
  title={Vomerolfaction and vomodor},
  author={W. Cooper and G. Burghardt},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={16},
  pages={103-105}
}
The major chemical senses of vertebrates are gustation, olfaction, and the sense supported by the vomeronasal system. The vomeronasal system is widespread in the tetrapods, being absent or vestigial only in crocodilians, some arboreal lizards, some aquatic turtles, birds, and adults of aquatic mammals and higher primates (Bertmar, 1981). Oddly, there is no term to denote chemical perception by the vomeronasal sense. At present, one must resort to vomeronasal sense, vomeronasal olfaction, or… Expand
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