Voices to reckon with: perceptions of voice identity in clinical and non-clinical voice hearers

@article{Badcock2013VoicesTR,
  title={Voices to reckon with: perceptions of voice identity in clinical and non-clinical voice hearers},
  author={Johanna C. Badcock and Saruchi Chhabra},
  journal={Frontiers in Human Neuroscience},
  year={2013},
  volume={7}
}
The current review focuses on the perception of voice identity in clinical and non-clinical voice hearers. Identity perception in auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) is grounded in the mechanisms of human (i.e., real, external) voice perception, and shapes the emotional (distress) and behavioral (help-seeking) response to the experience. Yet, the phenomenological assessment of voice identity is often limited, for example to the gender of the voice, and has failed to take advantage of recent… 
Auditory verbal hallucinations and continuum models of psychosis: A systematic review of the healthy voice-hearer literature
TLDR
Overall the results of the present systematic review support a continuum view rather than a diagnostic model, but cannot distinguish between ‘quasi’ and ‘fully’ dimensional models.
Self-voice perception and its relationship with hallucination predisposition
TLDR
These findings suggest that nonclinical participants with high HP experience altered voice identity processing, whereas HP does not affect the perception of vocal emotion.
Voice identity discrimination and hallucination-proneness in healthy young adults: a further challenge to the continuum model of psychosis?
TLDR
Findings suggest voice identity perception is not impaired in healthy individuals predisposed to hallucinations, adding a further challenge to the continuum model of psychotic symptoms.
Is this my voice or yours? The role of emotion and acoustic quality in self-other voice discrimination in schizophrenia
TLDR
It is suggested that abnormalities in higher order processes (evaluation of the salience of a speech stimulus) modulate impaired self-other voice discrimination in schizophrenia and abnormal processing of negative self-generated speech may play a role in the experience of AVH.
The Phenomenon of “Hearing Voices”: Not Just Psychotic Hallucinations—A Psychological Literature Review and a Reflection on Clinical and Social Health
TLDR
Several concepts that can support doctors, psychiatrists and practitioners in understanding “hearer” patients are highlighted, particularly attention to the context of belonging, attention to language, and the role of the sense-making process.
Emotional self-other voice processing in schizophrenia and its relationship with hallucinations: ERP evidence.
TLDR
The association between LPP amplitude and hallucination severity suggests that auditory hallucinations are associated with enhanced sustained attention to negative cues conveyed by a nonself voice.
A Cognitive Neuroscience View of Voice-Processing Abnormalities in Schizophrenia: A Window into Auditory Verbal Hallucinations?
TLDR
Behavioral, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological data are considered to investigate the speech, identity, and affective dimensions of voice processing in schizophrenia, and how abnormalities in these processes might help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying specific phenomenological features of AVH are discussed.
Getting Better Acquainted with Auditory Voice Hallucinations (AVHs): A Need for Clinical and Social Change
The phenomenon of hearing voices (AVHs) is very much a subject of current scientific interest, both clinically1 and socially. For a long time, auditory hallucinations—perceiving sounds without
A Neuropsychological Approach to Auditory Verbal Hallucinations and Thought Insertion - Grounded in Normal Voice Perception
  • J. Badcock
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Review of philosophy and psychology
  • 2016
TLDR
It is argued that previous self-monitoring theories struggle to account for both the differences and similarities in the characteristic features of AVH and TI, which can be readily accommodated within an APS framework.
Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Persons With and Without a Need for Care
TLDR
Research on AVH in nonclinical individuals is reviewed and a cross-disciplinary view of the clinical relevance of these experiences in defining the risk of mental illness and need for care is provided.
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 118 REFERENCES
Hearing Voices and Listening to What They Say: The Importance of Voice Content in Understanding and Working With Distressing Voices
  • V. Beavan, J. Read
  • Psychology, Medicine
    The Journal of nervous and mental disease
  • 2010
TLDR
Voice content was the only significant predictor of emotional distress and the strongest predictor of contact with mental health services, and should be explored with voice-hearers who find themselves in clinical settings.
What voices can do with words: pragmatics of verbal hallucinations.
TLDR
It is concluded that verbal hallucinations can be fruitfully considered to be a genus of inner speech with pragmatics and can be used as a framework to distinguish verbal hallucinations in different populations.
Hallucinatory Experiences in Non-clinical Populations
It is now widely recognised that some people hear voices in the absence of distress or a need for psychiatric care. Although there have been reports of such individuals throughout history, until
Hearing Voices in a Non-Psychiatric Population
TLDR
It lends support to the idea that voice hearing occurs on a continuum, with evidence that many people hear voices in the general population and are not distressed by the experience.
The role of social schema in the experience of auditory hallucinations: a systematic review and a proposal for the inclusion of social schema in a cognitive behavioural model of voice hearing.
  • G. Paulik
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Clinical psychology & psychotherapy
  • 2012
TLDR
A systematic literature review of relevant studies was undertaken, including those that investigated how social processes interact with appraisals of voices, as well as affective and behavioural responding to voices, finding two well-replicated findings.
The omnipotence of voices. A cognitive approach to auditory hallucinations.
  • P. Chadwick, M. Birchwood
  • Psychology, Medicine
    The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science
  • 1994
TLDR
It is shown that highly disparate relationships with voices-fear, reassurance, engagement and resistance-reflect vital differences in beliefs about the voices, and how these core beliefs about voices may become a new target for treatment.
Voice identity discrimination in schizophrenia
TLDR
Patients with schizophrenia did not differ from healthy controls in their reliance on F0 in differentiating voices, suggesting that the ability to use pitch-based cues for discriminating voice identity may be relatively preserved in schizophrenia.
The omnipotence of voices: testing the validity of a cognitive model.
TLDR
The study found support for the cognitive model and therapeutic approach, which centre around the possibility that voice beliefs develop as part of an adaptive process to the experience of voices, and are underpinned by core beliefs about the individuals self-worth and interpersonal schemata.
Interpersonal and role-related schema influence the relationship with the dominant ‘voice’ in schizophrenia: a comparison of three models
TLDR
Findings suggest important new targets for intervention with cognitive and social therapy, suggesting that voices can be seen to operate like external social relationships and voice content and experience can mirror a person's social sense of being powerless and controlled by others.
Towards a definition of “hearing voices”: A phenomenological approach
Despite an increasingly comprehensive research literature on hearing voices, few attempts have been made to define the phenomenon and fewer still have sought to do so based on voice‐hearers'
...
1
2
3
4
5
...