Voice hearing in a biographical context: A model for formulating the relationship between voices and life history

@article{Longden2012VoiceHI,
  title={Voice hearing in a biographical context: A model for formulating the relationship between voices and life history},
  author={Eleanor Longden and Dirk Corstens and Sandra Escher and M. A. J. Romme},
  journal={Psychosis},
  year={2012},
  volume={4},
  pages={224 - 234}
}
Growing evidence suggests a meaningful association between life experience, particularly trauma and loss, and subsequent psychotic symptomatology. This paper describes a method of psychological formulation to analyse the relationship between the content and characteristics of voices (“auditory hallucinations”) and experienced adversity in the life of the voice-hearer. This systematic process of enquiry, termed a construct, is designed to explore two questions: (1) who or what might the voices… 
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How the self has been conceptualised in the psychosis and CBT literatures is outlined, followed by a review of the evidence regarding the proposed role of this construct in the etiology of and adaptation to voice hearing experiences.
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The HVM emphasizes a few basic, but important, points: that antipsychotic pharmacotherapy and various forms of psychotherapy that aim to suppress psychotic experiences are often—for too many people—ineffective or insufficient.
Dissociation, victimisation, and their associations with voice hearing in young adults experiencing first-episode psychosis
Background: It has been proposed that voice hearing, even in the context of psychosis, is associated with high levels of dissociation - especially amongst individuals with a history of childhood
Dissociation, trauma, and the role of lived experience: toward a new conceptualization of voice hearing.
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It is argued that available evidence suggests that VH experiences, including those in the context of psychotic disorders, can be most appropriately understood as dissociated or disowned components of the self that result from trauma, loss, or other interpersonal stressors.
An Empirical Analysis of the Implicit Cognitions in Voice Hearing using the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure
The current programme of research had two main aims. First, in response to a gap in the literature on implicit measures in the context of psychosis, the current thesis sought to determine the utility
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