Vocal Mimicry of Alarm-Associated Sounds by a Drongo Elicits Flee and Mobbing Responses from Other Species that Participate in Mixed-Species Bird Flocks

@article{Goodale2014VocalMO,
  title={Vocal Mimicry of Alarm-Associated Sounds by a Drongo Elicits Flee and Mobbing Responses from Other Species that Participate in Mixed-Species Bird Flocks},
  author={Eben Goodale and Chaminda P Ratnayake and Sarath Wimalabandara Kotagama},
  journal={Ethology},
  year={2014},
  volume={120},
  pages={266-274}
}
A growing number of studies have shown that vocal mimicry appears to be adaptive for some bird species, although the exact function of this behaviour varies among species. Previous work has looked at the function of the vocal mimicry of non-alarm sounds by the Greater Racket-tailed Drongo (Dicurus paradiseus). But drongos also imitate sounds associated with danger, such as predators' vocalisations or the mobbing-specific vocalisations of other prey species, raising the question of whether the… 

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