Vocal Emotion Recognition Across Disparate Cultures

@article{Bryant2008VocalER,
  title={Vocal Emotion Recognition Across Disparate Cultures},
  author={G. Bryant and H. Barrett},
  journal={Journal of Cognition and Culture},
  year={2008},
  volume={8},
  pages={135-148}
}
There exists substantial cultural variation in how emotions are expressed, but there is also considerable evidence for universal properties in facial and vocal affective expressions. This is the first empirical effort examining the perception of vocal emotional expressions across cultures with little common exposure to sources of emotion stimuli, such as mass media. Shuar hunter-horticulturalists from Amazonian Ecuador were able to reliably identify happy, angry, fearful and sad vocalizations… Expand
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