• Corpus ID: 201689536

Viviparity in a Triassic marine archosauromorph reptile

@inproceedings{Chun2017ViviparityIA,
  title={Viviparity in a Triassic marine archosauromorph reptile},
  author={Li(李淳) Chun and Olivier Rieppel and Nicholas C. Fraser},
  year={2017}
}
Eggs or embryos have been reported in various groups of fossil reptiles, where viviparity is a common mode of reproduction in aquatic taxa such as the ichthyopterygians, some groups of sauropterygians, mosasauroids, some taxa of choristoderans and certain protorosaurs. Here, we describe a complete embryo of a marine protorosaur, based on a well-preserved, curledup skeleton. The new discovery is referred to a taxon closely related to the remarkable longnecked Dinocephalosaurus. It further… 
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A new phylogenetic hypothesis of Tanystropheidae (Diapsida, Archosauromorpha) and other “protorosaurs”, and its implications for the early evolution of stem archosaurs
TLDR
The polyphyly of “Protorosauria” is confirmed and therefore the usage of this term should be abandoned and a new phylogenetic hypothesis is presented that comprises a wide range of archosauromorphs, including the most exhaustive sample of ”protorosaurs” to date and several “protorosaur” taxa from the eastern Tethys margin that have not been included in any previous analysis.

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